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How Magic Mushrooms Are Helping People With Alcoholism

Aug 26

Introduction

The relationship between alcohol and mental health is complicated. Those with alcohol dependency have a higher risk of depression and anxiety, while those with anxiety or depression are more prone to substance abuse. In some cases, those suffering from alcoholism also experience panic attacks or psychotic episodes triggered by drinking. In order to combat these issues, researchers at Johns Hopkins University conducted a study on psilocybin-assisted therapy for alcoholism. They found that the psychedelic drug reduced anxiety, depression and hopelessness in participants during their first session on psilocybin—and maintained these positive effects six months later when tested again after taking psilocybin as part of their treatment program.

Magic mushrooms are psychedelic drugs.

Psychedelic drugs are substances that have the potential to alter one’s perception, thoughts, and feelings. Psychedelics can also cause changes in mood, perception, and thinking patterns. Many psychedelics are classified as hallucinogens due to their ability to induce hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren’t there). But not all psychedelic drugs are hallucinogenic; some work by affecting serotonin levels in the brain—a neurotransmitter responsible for regulating mood and aggression—or reducing activity within certain parts of our brains.

Psilocybin—the active ingredient in magic mushrooms—is a potent psychedelic substance with a long history of use by humans across many cultures throughout history. The earliest known reference dates back 15th Century BC Egypt where psilocybin was used as part of religious rituals performed by priests devoted to honoring their gods through mystical experiences with plants found around them like psilocybin mushrooms growing on cow dung heaps near temples or shrines dedicated to deities such as Osiris who had died but whose spirit continued living among humans through these sacred places where they could encounter him face-to-face while under the influence of these substances during ceremonies conducted once every year during springtime (between February 21st & May 1st).

Scientists at Johns Hopkins University researched the effects of psilocybin-assisted therapy for alcoholism.

The researchers at Johns Hopkins University studied the effects of psilocybin-assisted therapy for alcoholism. The study, published in January 2019, involved 51 participants who were given either a high dose (30mg) or low dose (10mg) of psilocybin in two sessions: one week apart.

The scientists found that both doses decreased anxiety, depression and hopelessness in their participants. However, those who received a higher dose experienced less cravings after treatment than those who received a lower dose.

The results suggest that magic mushrooms could be used as an alternative treatment for alcoholism because they reduce cravings without having any negative side effects like addiction.

They found that the psychedelic drug reduced anxiety, depression and hopelessness in their participants.

You don't have to look far to find a story about the dangers of alcohol addiction. But there's another side to the story, one that is overlooked: what happens when people stop drinking?

One of the biggest obstacles for people is overcoming their cravings for alcohol and dealing with withdrawal symptoms—and it's not just physical dependence that makes it so difficult for someone who has been drinking for years (or even decades) to stop suddenly. Alcoholics often struggle with mental health issues like depression or anxiety, which can be exacerbated by quitting drinking cold turkey.

In this study, researchers found that psilocybin-assisted therapy could help reduce these mental health issues in patients seeking treatment for their alcoholism. In other words: magic mushrooms may not cure alcoholism; but they can make recovery from it easier—and that's pretty amazing news!

The number of drinks participants had consumed decreased significantly when tested after taking psilocybin.

In a study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, researchers found that the number of drinks participants had consumed decreased significantly when tested after taking psilocybin. The decrease was more than just statistically significant—it was sustained over time and not due to a placebo effect.

The authors of this study recruited 51 individuals who were struggling with alcoholism and enrolled them in an eight-week treatment program. Half of these participants received psilocybin mushrooms at one dose (30 mg), while the other half got a placebo pill with no hallucinogenic effects. Both groups then continued their treatment for another six weeks without any further drug or supplement administration.

After six months, about 60 percent of participants remained abstinent from alcohol and had significant improvements in moods and life satisfaction.

After six months, about 60 percent of participants remained abstinent from alcohol and had significant improvements in moods and life satisfaction. This was compared to the control group, who did not receive psilocybin therapy.

In a new study released today in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, researchers found that this therapy is promising for those struggling with alcoholism.

Researchers from New York University and UCLA corroborated these findings.

The study, which was published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, was led by researchers from New York University and UCLA. It was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that included 126 participants.

The study was conducted at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. Funding came from the Heffter Research Institute and other sources.

Psilocybin can be an alternative treatment for alcoholism and may have a positive impact on quality of life in those who struggle with it.

Psilocybin, the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms, may be a valuable therapeutic option for people struggling with alcoholism. In a pilot study conducted by the Beckley/Imperial Research Programme and the Heffter Research Institute, psilocybin-assisted therapy was shown to help patients decrease their desire to drink and improve quality of life.

The study followed 51 patients who were given either psilocybin or niacin (a placebo) as part of their therapy sessions. They also had six months of follow up treatment. The results were positive: after six months, 43 percent of those who received psilocybin reported reduced drinking compared to just 14 percent in the placebo group. Patients who received psilocybin also had improved health and well-being based on standard measures.

In addition to its apparent benefits for reducing alcohol consumption in some patients, studies have found that psilocybin may also aid in smoking cessation as well as depression treatment

Conclusion

In conclusion, psilocybin can be an alternative treatment for alcoholism and may have a positive impact on quality of life in those who struggle with it.